* Mass Schedule
* Instructions
* 10 reasons to attend Sunday Mass

 

 

Masses are being celebrated on the following hours:

Sunday

7:30 AM – In Polish
9:00 AM – In English
10:15 AM – In Polish
11:00 AM – In English (lower church)
11:30 AM – In Polish
1:00 PM – In Polish
8:00 PM – In Polish

Monday

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
9:00 AM – In Polish
7:00 PM – In Polish

Tuesday

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
7:00 PM – In Polish

Środa

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
7:00 PM – In Polish

Thursday

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
7:00 PM – In Polish

Friday

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
7:00 PM – In Polish

Saturday

6:30 AM – In Polish
7:00 AM – In Polish
8:00 AM – In English
5:30 PM – In English /Sunday Mass/
7:00 PM – In Polish / Sunday Mass /

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IMPORTANT INSTRUCTION FOR PARTICIPANTS:

Our faith teaches us that nothing we do can equal the value of the celebration of the Eucharist. In this Sacrament Christ, our Redeemer, is present and active as Priest and Victim, building His Body the Church in holiness, praising His Father and bringing salvation to the world. By this great Sacrament we are joined to one another through our communion in Christ and are supplied with every divine assistance that we need. The following points concern the activity of the faithful during the Liturgy:

1. In the United States of America, all the faithful will kneel from the Holy Holy until after the Amen of the Eucharistic Prayer … The faithful kneel after the Lamb of God until they rise to approach Holy Communion, in the Archdiocese of Hartford, since this has been the practice, this is only a reiteration of what is required. The only exception are the aged or infirm.

2. During the Communion Rite, at the Rite of Peace, once the priest says, “The peace of the Lord be with you,” and the people respond, the invitation is given to extend a gesture of peace to one another. The directive of the revised Missal for the Rite of Peace states: “the priest remains in the sanctuary “so that the celebration not be disturbed” and the people “offer the sign of peace only to those nearby and in a dignified manner.” “At the same time, in accord with the decisions of the Conference of Bishops, all offer one another I sign that expresses peace, communion, and charity. While the sign of peace is being given, one may say, The peace of the Lord be with you always, to which the response is Amen. ”

3. Some modifications concern the reception of Holy Communion. The reception of Holy Communion should be reverent and indicate our awareness that we receive Jesus Christ, the Son of God and our Lord Who thereby joins us to one another.

a. In the United States, all the faithful will show reverence before receiving Holy Communion by an inclination (a bow) of the head. [This replaces other signs of reverence such as the sign of the cross, genuflection, etc. ]
b. In the United States “the norm for reception of Holy Communion is standing. Communicants should not be denied Holy Communion because they kneel. ”
c. In the United States: Holy Communion “may be received either on the tongue or in the hand at the discretion of the communicant.”

4. Three Prayers of the Mass indicate the theme of the Liturgy of that day: the Opening Prayer, the Prayer over the Gifts, and the Prayer after Communion. Frequently the faithful are distracted during the payer Over the Gifts because they are rising to stand while it is being prayed. For this reason the following modification is being made: the faithful are invited to stand as they say the words, “May the Lord receive this sacrifice from your hands, …. “.

My hope is that the consideration and implementation of these few modifications will offer to all an occasion for growth in understanding and reverence for the action of Christ in the Liturgy. I would like to press my gratitude to all who will utilize this opportunity to foster love and reverence for the Mysteries of Christ that we celebrate.

Posture of the Faithful at Mass

The new Roman Missal and the adaptations approved and confirmed for the Dioceses of the United States of America make some minor changes to the posture2 of the faithful at Mass. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal notes that: ” … uniformity in posture, which must be observed by all participants, is a sign of the unity of the members of the Christian community gathered for the Sacred Liturgy: it both expresses and fosters the mind and spiritual attitude of the participants.” (GIRM, no. 42) The postures listed below are required of all the faithful

The moment in the Mass Posture Applies
From the beginning of Mass until the First Reading STAND worldwide4
From the first Reading until the Gospel Acclamation SIT worldwide
From the Gospel Acclamation until the end of the Gospel STAND worldwide
During the Homily SIT worldwide
From the Profession of Faith until the end of the Intercessions STAND worldwide
From the Offertory/ Preparation of the Gifts to the completion of the prayer of the priest: “Pray brethren …Father Almighty.” SIT worldwide
From the beginning of the people’s response: “May the Lord accept this sacrifice … for our good and the good of all his Church.” to the end of the Holy Holy STAND worldwide
From the completion of the Holy, Holy until after the Amen of the Eucharistic Prayer KNEEL In the USA
From the beginning of the Our Father until the completion of the Lamb of God. STAND worldwide
From the completion of the Lamb of God (at the Behold the Lamb of God … ) until the Distribution of Holy Communion KNEEL in the USA
While Receiving Communion5 STAND in the USA
During the sacred silence after the Distribution of Holy Communion until the priest says: “Let us pray.” to introduce the Prayer after Communion. SIT OR KNEEL worldwide
From the beginning of the Prayer after Communion until Mass ends. STAND worldwide

1) The chart is adapted from one prepared by the Secretariat for the Liturgy of the USCCB.
2) A modification in our practice is evident in # 6 and 7. The United States Bishops decided # 10 and 11. See note 5 below.
3) The only exception in the Archdiocese of Hartford being those physically unable to kneel for reasons of age or infirmity.
4) This refers to the Roman rite worldwide.
5) Holy Communion should be received standing. In the United States, the common sign of reverence to be made immediately before receiving Communion is a bow of the head. When Holy Communion is administered under both species, the communicant also bows the head before receiving from the chalice. Communion may be received on the tongue or in the hand at the discretion of the communicant.

WITH REVERENCE FOR CHRIST WE APPROACH HOLY COMMUNION

The Church teaches that in Holy Communion we receive our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ Who is truly present under the appearance of bread and wine. The greatest reverence must be given to Christ, present in the action of the Liturgy and reserved in the tabernacle.

From the time that Holy Communion has been distributed to the faithful while standing, the communicant was directed to make some sign of reverence before receiving Communion. During these years, the sign was left to individual choice. Now, in an effort to give greater emphasis to our reverence by a single gesture prescribed for all, the Bishops of the United States have acted as a body to direct the faithful throughout the Nation to make a bow of the head before receiving Communion. A description of the norm follows:

In the U.S.A:

o ” … the communicant bows his or her head before the Sacrament as a gesture of reverence and receives the Body of the Lord from the minister.” (This is indication that throughout the United States the bow of the head replaces other reverent gestures by the faithful such as a sign of the cross, a genuflection, kneeling, etc.).

o This” … sign of reverence is also made before receiving the Precious Blood.”

o Communion “may be received either on the tongue or in the hand at the· discretion of each communicant.”

o “The norm for reception of Holy Communion in the dioceses of the United States is standing. Communicants should not be denied Holy Communion because they kneel. … ”

o Throughout the world: “The faithful may not take up the consecrated bread or the sacred chalice themselves, and still less, hand them on to one another.”

 

The Rite of Peace: We offer the peace of Christ

Just before the time for Holy Communion, the priest turns to the people and says, “The peace of the Lord be with you always.” We respond, “And also with you. ” Then, we are invited to extend a gesture of peace to one another. What is it that we actually are doing? A clue to the answer is found in the words of the priest, “The peace of the Lord be with you always.”

The Rite of Peace is an outward demonstration of what we share with one another in Christ. It is not a gesture of hospitality or a matter of “passing on” to the person our peace. We are not told: “Welcome one another.” “Share your peace, with your neighbor.” There is a reason. This rite and the whole Liturgy is about Christ, the Redeemer, our only source of enduring peace and of communion with one another. The peace we pray for and wish for one another is the same peace that Jesus offered to the Apostles on Easter Sunday night when he appeared to them, “Peace be with —-you.” (John 20: 19)

The revised Roman Missal, in par. 82 describes the purpose of the Rite: “The rite of peace follows, by which the Church asks for peace and unity for herself and for the whole human family, and the faithful express some sign of their ecc1esial communion and mutual charity for each other before receiving sacramental Communion …. ”

” … it is appropriate that each person offer the sign of peace only to those nearby and in a dignified manner.”

Directions to the priest are found in the United States Adaptations of the norms in the Roman Missal par. 154.2 “The priest may give the sign of peace to the ministers, but always remains within the sanctuary, so that the celebration not be disturbed …. At the same time, in accord with the decisions of the Conference of Bishops, all offer one another a sign that expresses peace, communion, and charity. While the sign of peace is being given, one may say, The peace of the Lord be with you always, to which the response is Amen.”

A few moments after we make this gesture, we approach the Banquet where Christ nourishes us with His own Body and Blood in Holy Communion.

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10 Good Reasons To Go To Sunday Mass

Every summer we are reminded and admonished by our priests that the summer is not a vacation from Sunday Mass, emphasizing that we should take this into consideration while away on vacation over weekends. And how do we react to these reminders? In different ways. Personally, I do not have a problem with this, but I read with interest an article titled “10 Good Reasons To Go To Sunday Mass” in one of the bulletins issued by a church I go to frequently. I decided to share with you the thoughts and suggestions of the writer during this “difficult” vacation period.

1. God asks us to make one day holy. God asks us to set aside one day per week to refocus physically, mentally, and spiritually. We live in a secular world. Going to Sunday Mass helps us to see everything from a different perspective. We begin to see in the depths of our being that God is in charge.

2. Jesus gives us the gift of Himself. When we go to Sunday Mass, we are doing what Jesus commanded His followers to do. It is a command of love, to love God and others and to be loved by God. Jesus is present and comes to us in the Word of God we hear proclaimed and in His Real Presence, in the Blessed Sacrament.

3. We need to be part of a community. When we come together at Sunday Mass to pray and worship God, we satisfy a deep need, human and spiritual, to be in communion with other people. The other parishioners — even if we don’t know all of them —give us support, affirmation, and encouragement in our attempt to live the Gospel message. They help us to see that we are not alone in living our Catholic Faith.

4. God has a special message for us. When we listen to the readings, the homily, and the prayers of the Mass, God speaks to us in a special way. We should come away from each Sunday Mass with at least one new thought or inspiration that will have a positive impact in our lives.

5. We need to talk to God. When we go to Mass, we speak to God through our singing, our communal responses and prayers, and our personal prayers from the depths of our hearts. During Mass we have the opportunity to ask God for what we need, to promise God we will do what He wants us to do, and thank God for the many blessings He has bestowed on us.

6. People need our prayers. We can pray for other people anytime, but when we pray for others during Mass, we pray in a special way. It doesn’t matter if the other people are separated from us by distance or by death.

7. We need to stand up for what we believe. Being a follower of Jesus is counter-cultural. At every Mass, we have the opportunity to stand up and proclaim what we believe publicly. We admit that we believe in one God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and in the teaching of the Catholic Church.

8. We need to acknowledge that we make mistakes. At every Mass, we have the opportunity to review the past week. We admit that we have sinned in thought, in word, in deed, in what we have done and what we have failed to do. With God’s help, we resolve to change our lives.

9. We need ritual in our lives. Mass is offered as a Sacred Ritual. This means that through the familiar prayers, and movements, through the Divine Miracle of Transubstantiation, changing bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Jesus, we are formed, disciplined, and consoled. The “sameness” of the Mass supports and nourishes our spiritual journey every week.

10. We need to experience something bigger than ourselves. When we go to Mass, we share in the Suffering, Death and Resurrection of Jesus. When we offer our ordinary lives to God through Jesus, we enter into God’s great plan for the world’s salvation.

(Adapted from an article in Our Sunday Visitor.) Krystyna Piotrowska-Breger

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PSYCHOLOGIST, Dr. Krystyna Piotrowska Breger, graduate of the Jagiellonian Institute may be able to help in the following situations: ?? Problems of adjustment (changes in personal life) ?? Family conflicts ?? Adolescent issues ?? Onset of psychological problems ?? Drug and alcohol dependency Dr. Breger also provides services at UNITAS. Consultations available by appointment only through the parish rectory .

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